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vvv-config.yml is the default config file that VVV uses to set itself up. Copy this file to vvv-custom.yml to make changes and add your own site.

Here’s the full default config file, with every key and option that VVV supports:

sites:
  wordpress-default:
    repo: https://github.com/Varying-Vagrant-Vagrants/vvv-wordpress-default.git
    vm_dir: /srv/www/wordpress-default
    local_dir: /Users/janesmith/dev/www/vvv/www/wordpress-default
    branch: master
    skip_provisioning: false
    allow_customfile: false
    nginx_upstream: php
    hosts:
      - local.wordpress.test

  wordpress-develop:
    repo: https://github.com/Varying-Vagrant-Vagrants/vvv-wordpress-develop.git
    vm_dir: /srv/www/wordpress-develop
    local_dir: /Users/janesmith/dev/www/vvv/www/wordpress-develop
    branch: master
    skip_provisioning: true
    allow_customfile: false
    nginx_upstream: php
    hosts:
      - develop.wordpress.test

vm_config:
  memory: 1024
  cores: 1

utilities:
  core:
    - memcached-admin
    - opcache-status
    - phpmyadmin
    - webgrind
utility-sources:
  core: https://github.com/Varying-Vagrant-Vagrants/vvv-utilities.git

Anatomy of a Site config

Let’s break apart the wordpress-default site:

sites:
  wordpress-default:
    repo: https://github.com/Varying-Vagrant-Vagrants/vvv-wordpress-default.git
    vm_dir: /srv/www/wordpress-default
    local_dir: /Users/janesmith/dev/www/vvv/www/wordpress-default
    branch: master
    skip_provisioning: false
    allow_customfile: false
    nginx_upstream: php
    hosts:

When defining a site, the only required item is the name of the site. This single line would be a perfectly valid site definition:

example-site:

repo

This specifies a git repository that contains the site to be provisioned. If set, VVV will grab the git repo, place it in the appropriate place, and provision the site

There’s also a shorthand version:

example-site: https://github.com/Varying-Vagrant-Vagrants/...

branch

If the repo key is being used, and the branch key is set, VVV will checkout that branch instead of master.

vm_dir

This controls the folder inside the virtual machine the sites folder is mapped on to.

local_dir

This controls which folder on the host machine VVV uses for this site. By default, it uses a folder with the sites name inside the www subfolder.

For example, a site named test would be inside the www/test folder.

skip_provisioning

If there are a lot of sites in vvv-custom.yml, you may want to skip several sites that aren’t in use. To do this, set the skip_provisioning key, for example:

sites:
  wordpress-default:
    repo: https://github.com/Varying-Vagrant-Vagrants/vvv-wordpress-default.git
    skip_provisioning: true

Now VVV will skip that site when running the provisioner. This means that the hosts, nginx config, and vvv-init.sh script will not be copied or ran.

allow_customfile

It may be necessary to run ruby script during provisioning to do more complex things. This might be installing system wide packages inside the virtual machine etc.

It’s recommended that instead the utilities section be used when possible. Writing your own Vagrant Ruby code is an in depth topic, and could destabilise VVV if done incorrectly. This should only be used by advanced users with knowledge of the subject.

Note that Customfile will be looked for in the site’s local_dir, or in the VVV installation folder.

nginx_upstream

This option sets where Nginx passes requests to, and is primarily for setting the PHP version used. You can read more about it here.

hosts

This defines the domains and hosts for VVV to listen on. If the vagrant host plugin is installed, your hosts file will automatically be updated when the machine is turned on and off

hosts:
  - local.wordpress.test

vm_config

These settings control the Virtual Machine that Vagrant creates. By default this is 1024MB of RAM and 1 core.

This configuration would tell VVV to create a virtual machine with 2GB of RAM and a single CPU core:

vm_config:
  memory: 2048
  cores: 1

Utilities

These are repositories and packages VVV pulls in to provide services, such as MySQL, PHPMyAdmin, or Memcached. Additional versions of PHP may be added here.